State vs Glanden, sentencing scheduled for September 22 in Caroline County.

| September 23, 2017 | 1 Comment

Joseph Riley , Kristina Arriaga State’s Attorney Sr. Assistant State’s Attorney

Zachary Reid , Dempsey Stewart Deputy State Attorney

Caroline Norman Assistant State’s Attorney

 

On July 29, 2016, Federalsburg police responded to a residence regarding a potential overdose. When they arrived, the Defendant, Christopher Glanden (who was the one who had supposedly overdosed) was up and walking around. When the police made contact with the Defendant, he was barefoot and the police noticed a pair of shoes nearby that appeared to have a large amount of wax folds inside. The Defendant agreed to be checked out by EMS and was searched prior to being allowed into the ambulance. That search revealed additional wax folds of suspected heroin. Between his shoes and his person, a total of 156 wax folds containing suspected heroin were located. The wax folds were marked with differing stamps, but a large amount of which were stamped specifically “KING” in red ink. Additionally, the Defendant’s cell phone was seized and a search warrant was obtained to search it for any CDS related messages.

 

 

The wax folds were sent to the Maryland State Crime Lab, were analyzed, and the only CDS contained within them was not Heroin, but in fact Fentanyl (the chemist testified that there appeared to be non-CDS cutting agents added, but they didn’t analyze what it was or what percent it made up of the whole). Each one of these folds contained enough fentanyl to cause an overdose and potential death, according to the State’s expert who testified at trial. The Defendant’s phone was downloaded by the Caroline County Drug Task Force and found to contain numerous messages pertaining to CDS distribution. The messages showed the Defendant initiating drug deals with others to sell them CDS, settling on quantity and price for his sales, soliciting finder’s fees (in bags of CDS) for others who would locate and put him in contact with CDS buyers, setting up transportation for drug deals (making sure the car was clean so it wouldn’t be stopped by police for minor traffic violations), bragging about the drugs’ potency he was selling, and bragging about how he had the perfect concealed spot to deal drugs at where nobody would find them. The messages were exchanged with people whose names were ranged from as normal as “Vanessa” and “Daniel” to people with colorful street names like “Humbo” and “Cmurda”. Included in the numerous text message conversations with several other people was a string of 28 back and forth text messages between the Defendant and a female about arranging to meet for the Defendant to sell her “red stamp king”. That string of messages occurred over approximately 2 hours on July 29 that almost immediately preceded the overdose call that began this entire case.

 

 

After defeating several defense motions by the Defendant’s attorney Maureen Keogh to dismiss the case and exclude evidence, the case was tried in front of a jury on July 6 & 7, 2017. In under an hour, the jury returned a verdict of guilty for the sole count of possession with the intent to distribute Fentanyl.

The Defendant is 26 years old and already has a major criminal record as an adult according to the Maryland Sentencing Guidelines. His convictions span two states, began immediately when he was 18, include multiple felonies, and a prior CDS conviction. Additionally, at the time of this offense, the Defendant was on probation in 4 separate cases for which he is now facing violations (3 in Caroline County and 1 in Dorchester County). The State charged him as a repeat offender under Criminal Law 5-905 which allows for double the maximum if the Defendant has a prior CDS related conviction. His guidelines in this case are 14 years to 28 years active and his total exposure is 40 years.

 

 

Despite the overwhelming evidence to the contrary, the Defendant refuses to accept any responsibility for this case and maintains in the pre-sentence investigation that the drugs located were all for his personal use, despite there being no paraphernalia located at the scene.

 

 

It is no secret that opiates present a giant problem not only in Caroline County, but also the Eastern Shore, Maryland, and the United States in general. Distribution of these opiates is not only a crime that is bad unto itself, but it effects so many other aspects of this county. People are overdosing and dying at record rates. Parents hooked on opiates are abandoning the care of their children at best and endangering them in a myriad of ways at worst. Thefts and burglaries are virtually always tied to addicts attempting to obtain money from stolen property to buy more drugs. Impaired driving due to opiate intoxication is up which further endangers others on the road. (This office, in the past, has prosecuted a man high on heroin who drove over the center line and killed another driver.) Massive amounts of money are required to obtain large supplies of Naloxone that is often turning police into pseudo EMTs at the ever-increasing overdose scenes they respond to. All these costs are born by society while the drug dealers are gaining hand over fist. Drug dealers can spend very little time, effort, and money and in return reap massive sustainable monetary rewards. If the State is not going to consistently counter the rewards of opiate dealing with a commensurate high risk of long term incarceration, then why would anyone believe that the risk/reward calculation will result in anything but a decision to deal?

 

 

This office is aware of and supportive of the efforts of the Governor to not only push money and other resources to treatment and rehabilitation for opiate users, but also to seek tough sanctions on those that are convicted of dealing. The Governor’s recent appearance in St. Mary’s County in response to the manslaughter indictments against the drug dealers is a perfect example of the latter. This is not about a mob demanding the max for every defendant in every case from a judge, but rather a sustained effort to show courts that there is no larger, more encompassing criminal issue in this community than opiates and those that distribute them.

 

 

The sentencing hearing in this case was September 22 at 9:30am. Ad Interim State’s Attorney represented the State at sentencing and asked for a sentence of 40 years suspend all but 28 years (a top of the active guidelines sentence). Ms. Keogh representing the Defendant asked for an active local sentence (a maximum of eighteen months). Sentencing Judge Sydney Campen (Ret.) cited that Maryland has had the greatest increase in deaths in the last year in the United States. He also went over the facts of the case that showed the Defendant was more than a user but obviously a dealer as well. He sentenced the Defendant to 35 years suspending 10 giving him 25 years to serve.

 

Zachary Reid – Deputy State’s Attorney for Caroline County

Prosecutor of the Defendant.

 

 

——-

 

Joseph Riley , Kristina Arriaga State’s Attorney Sr. Assistant State’s Attorney

Zachary Reid , Dempsey Stewart Deputy State Attorney

Caroline Norman Assistant State’s Attorney

 

On July 29, 2016, Federalsburg police responded to a residence regarding a potential overdose. When they arrived, the Defendant, Christopher Glanden, (who was the one who had supposedly overdosed) was up and walking around. The Defendant’s mother mentioned that she observed him trying to conceal CDS before the police arrived. When the police made contact with the Defendant, he was barefoot and the police noticed a pair of shoes nearby that appeared to have a large amount of wax folds inside. The Defendant agreed to be checked out by EMS and was searched prior to being allowed into the ambulance. That search revealed additional wax folds of suspected heroin. Between his shoes and his person, a total of 156 wax folds containing suspected heroin were located. The wax folds were marked with differing stamps, but a large amount of which were stamped specifically “KING” in red ink. Additionally, the Defendant’s cell phone was seized and a search warrant was obtained to search it for any CDS related messages.

 

The wax folds were sent to the Maryland State Crime Lab, were analyzed, and the only CDS contained within them was not Heroin, but in fact Fentanyl (the chemist testified that there appeared to be non-CDS cutting agents added, but they didn’t analyze what it was or what percent it made up of the whole). Each one of these folds contained enough fentanyl to cause an overdose and potential death. The Defendant’s phone was downloaded by the Caroline County Drug Task Force and found to contain numerous messages pertaining to CDS distribution. The messages showed the Defendant initiating drug deals with others to sell them CDS, settling on quantity and price for his sales, soliciting finder’s fees (in bags of CDS) for others who would locate and put him in contact with CDS buyers, setting up transportation for drug deals (making sure the car was clean so it wouldn’t be stopped by police for minor traffic violations), bragging about the drugs’ potency he was selling, and bragging about how he had the perfect concealed spot to deal drugs at where nobody would find them. The messages were exchanged with people whose names were ranged from as normal as “Vanessa” and “Daniel” to people with colorful street names like “Humbo” and “Cmurda”. Included in the numerous text message conversations with several other people was a string of 28 back and forth text messages between the Defendant and a female about arranging to meet for the Defendant to sell her “red stamp king”. That mstring of messages occurred over approximately 2 hours on July 29 that almost immediately preceded the overdose call that began this entire case.

 

After defeating several defense motions to dismiss the case and exclude evidence, the case was tried in front of a jury on July 6 & 7, 2017. In under an hour, the jury returned a verdict of guilty for the sole count of possession with the intent to distribute fentanyl. The sentencing date for this offense is currently set for September 22 at 9:30am at the Circuit Courthouse in Denton.

 

The Defendant is 26 years old and already has a major criminal record as an adult according to the Maryland Sentencing Guidelines. His convictions span two states, began immediately when he was 18, include multiple felonies, and a prior CDS conviction. Additionally, at the time of this offense, the Defendant was on probation in 4 separate cases for which he is now facing violations (3 in Caroline County and 1 in Dorchester County). The State charged him as a repeat offender under criminal law 5- 905 which allows for double the maximum if the Defendant has a prior CDS related conviction. His guidelines in this case are 14 years to 28 years active and his total exposure is 40 years.

 

Despite the overwhelming evidence to the contrary, the Defendant refuses to accept any responsibility for this case and maintains in the pre-sentence investigation that the drugs located were all for his personal use, despite there being no paraphernalia located at the scene.

 

It is no secret that opiates present a giant problem not only in Caroline County, but also the Eastern Shore, Maryland, and the United States in general. Distribution of these opiates is not only a crime that is bad unto itself, but it effects so many other aspects of this county. People are overdosing and dying at record rates. Parents hooked on opiates are abandoning the care of their children at best and endangering them in a myriad of ways at worst. Thefts and burglaries are virtually always tied to addicts attempting to obtain money from stolen property to buy more drugs. Impaired driving due to opiate intoxication is up which further endangers others on the road. (This office, in the past, has prosecuted a man high on heroin who drove over the center line and killed another driver.) Massive amounts of money are required to obtain large supplies of Naloxone that is often turning police into pseudo EMTs at the ever-increasing overdose scenes they respond to. All these costs are born by society while the drug dealers are gaining hand over fist. Drug dealers can spend very little time, effort, and money and in return reap massive sustainable monetary rewards. If the State is not going to consistently counter the rewards of opiate dealing with a commensurate high risk of long term incarceration, then why would anyone believe that the risk/reward calculation will result in anything but a decision to deal?

 

It is this office’s belief that while there is a groundswell of community support for drug treatment and rehabilitation for users, that communal support has failed to materialize in seeking tough sentences for those that deal death for profit in the community. It is often the case that at sentencing the State is represented solely by the attorney that tried the case. The arresting or investigating police officer might appear for sentencing, but even that is rare. What almost never happens is to see leaders in the community show up for a sentencing to lend support for tough sanctions. On the other side however, it is routine for people to come out of the woodwork to support a convicted drug dealer. His parents talk about how he is a good kid and how they need his help. His girlfriend or baby mother says she needs him out of jail to make money for her and the kid. His boss talks about how good of a worker he is and how he’s needed at work. A pastor comes in to say how good of a kid he was. The Defendant generally without fail says he is just a victim of his own addiction and this time it’s different and he is going to change. These lopsided presentations have a real effect on the outcomes of these cases and,

 

often work to significantly lower the sentences that these societal parasites receive. Recently, this office successfully prosecuted and convicted an individual for possession with the intent to distribute heroin after a jury trial. Like in this case, the Defendant never admitted guilt, even after the verdict was entered. The State filed a repeat offender notice against the Defendant and his guidelines were calculated at 3-8 years active time. At sentencing the State attempted to reiterate the ills of opiate distribution and fought for a tough D.O.C. sentence. However, after hearing the Defendant’s mitigation which relied, in part, on people speaking on the Defendant’s behalf and the Defendant blaming his own addiction, the visiting judge not only departed well below the guidelines (only 234 days of active incarceration), but also let him serve them on weekends. This office believes these excessively lenient sentences 1) only encourage those involved in the drug trade to believe that the rewards far outweigh the risks involved, 2) put these dealers quickly back on the street where they can continue to ply their trade, and 3) would occur far less and be harder for publicly elected judges to defend if prosecutors could point to a courtroom full of community leaders that are there to support high penalties for these offenses.

 

This office is aware of and supportive of the efforts of the governor to not only push money and other resources to treatment and rehabilitation for opiate users, but also to seek tough sanctions on those that are convicted of dealing. The governor’s recent appearance in St. Mary’s County in response to the manslaughter indictments against the drug dealers is a perfect example of the latter. We believe that support from the community, to include the governor or representatives from his office, in the form of showing up to sentencings for serious opiate distribution cases is another and important way in which we can attempt to produce meaningful sentences that protect our citizens and send a forceful message to those contemplating dealing in our communities. This is not about a mob demanding the max for every defendant in every case from a judge, but rather a sustained effort to show courts that there is no larger, more encompassing criminal issue in this community than opiates and those that distribute them.

 

Again, the sentencing in this case is set for September 22 at 9:30am. In addition to contacting your office about this case, we already have commitments from police agencies, county and local commissioners, as well as local community leaders to be present for this sentencing. If your office has any questions, concerns, or requires any other information, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

 

Zachary Reid Deputy State Attorney

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  1. Lynn Keckler says:

    I just got this in my email today, 9/24. I agree that tough sentences need to be imposed, and all of our children and grandchildren are at-risk.

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